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NT301/501 Jesus and the Gospels

3 hours per week semester 1, annually

Outcomes: To gain understanding of the historical, socio-cultural, religious and political setting of the gospels; to compare the distinctive features of each gospel ad to explore the message and ministry of Jesus.

 Description:
After studying the historical background to the gospel each one will be explored separately to discern the main themes of Jesus' message and ministry.

Textbooks:

  • D A Carson, D J Moo, An Introduction to the New Testament (2nd Ed., Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2005).
  • R H Gundry, A Survey of the New Testament ( 3rd Ed., Zondervan, 1994).

NT302/502 Early New Testament Church

3 hours per week semester 2, annually

Outcomes: To gain an understanding of the history, theology and narrative of he Book of Acts, and to investigate the contents, themes and theology of selected books of the New Testament.

Description: Candidates will develop an understanding of key developments in the growth of the earliest church, together with an awareness of developments in the Jerusalem church; early Christian preaching; Stephen and the Hellenists; The Pauline mission and churches; The Council of Jerusalem; Schism, heresy and external threat in the early church. In addition the background issues and main issues of 7 epistles of the New Testament will be studies.

Textbooks:

  • D A Carson & D J Moo, An introduction to the New Testament (2nd Ed., Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2005)

NT422/622ENG/NT432/632GRK Epistle to the Hebrews

3 hours per week semester 1

Outcomes: 

  1. to enable candidates to exegete large sections of the text from the Epistles to the Hebrews.
  2. to develop in candidates the skills of appropriate exegetical methodology, employing the various interpretive methods of biblical criticism and socio-cultural considerations. 
  3. to assist candidates to reflect upon signficant themes in Hebrews and the writer's pastoral and exhortatory expression.
  4. to explore the imagery and scriptural allusions as integrated and applied within the text of Hebrews. i.e. to help candidates think through the implications of their studies for the contemporary world and issues that challenge the church of today.


Description: The Theology of Hebrews is studied including such themes as covenant, high priesthood, perfection, use of the Old Testament and the church. In the exegesis class selected passages from the book are exegeted and presented in class by students.

Textbooks:

  • D Guthrie, Hebrews (IVP/Eerdmans, 1989).
  • P Ellingworth, Commentary on Hebrews NIGTC (Eerdmans, 1993).
  • A H Trotter, Interpreting the Epistle to the Hebrews (Baker, 1997).
  • G D Fee, New Testament Exegesis (Westminster, 1983).

NT424/624ENG/NT434/634GRK Fourth Gospel

3 hours per week semester 2, even years

Outcomes: 

  1. to enable candidates to exegete large sections of the text from John's Gospel
  2. to develop in candidates the skills of appropriate exegetical methodology, employing the various interpretative methods of biblical criticism and structural analysis
  3. to assist candidates to reflect upon significant themes and stylistic features in John's Gospel and indications of the writer's purpose in writing
  4. to explore the interplay between narrative, encounter, sign and teaching in the text of John's Gospel. i.e. to help candidates think through the implications of their studies for the contemporary world and issues that challenge the church of today

Description: To study the Gospel of John; introductory issues, its theology including topics such as Christology, pneumatology, eschatology, signs and faith. In the exegesis class selected passages from the Gospel of John are exegeted and presented in class by students.

Textbooks:

  • G M Burge, Interpreting the Gospel of John (Baker, 1992).
  • D A Carson, The Gospel According to John (IVP/Eerdmans, 1991).
  • G D Fee, New Testament Exegesis (Westminster, 1983).

NT425/625ENG/NT435/635GRK Pauline Theology and Romans

3 hours per week semester 2, odd years

Outcomes: 

  1. to enable candidates to study the theology of the Apostle Paul as it is reflected in his epistles. As an integrating unit, it is recommended that candidates have studied a Pauline Epistle at advanced level
  2. to gain an understanding of the purpose, literary shape, rhetorical form and arguments of Paul's letter to the Romans
  3. to develop an understanding of the 'new perspective' on Paul, with a capacity to critically evaluate its strengths and weaknesses
  4. to consider questions of coherence in Pauline theology, and differing socio-cultural and rhetorical contexts

    Description: The inner structure and leading themes of Paul’s theology, with special reference to the Epistle to the Romans, is studied. In the exegesis class selected passages are exegeted and presented in class by students.

     Textbooks:
  • H Ridderbos, Paul (Eerdmans, 1975).
  • D J Moo, The Epistle to the Romans NICNT (Eerdmans, 1996).
  • G D Fee, New Testament Exegesis (Westminster, 1983).
  • F F Bruce, Romans: An Introduction and Commentary (TP, 1971).
  • Robert L Reymond, Paul (Mentor, 2000).

NT427/627ENG/NT437/637GRK New Testament Apocalyptic

3 hours per week 2 semester, even years

Outcomes: 

  1. to explore evidence for the literary, socio-cultural, political and historical context reflected in Revelation
  2. to gain an understanding of broad structural form of Revelation, and the variety of interpretations addressing the eschatological perspectives reflected in Revelation
  3. to consider the interplay between godly worship, warnings and idolatry
  4. to gain an appreciation for the sweep of God's purposes and the employment of prophetic and apocalyptic genres

     Description:
    This unit looks at the historical, social and theological roots of New Testament Apocalyptic writings, especially the Book of Revelation. Also the theology of the Book of Revelation, including such themes as Christology, doctrine of God, judgement and hope.

Textbooks:

  • G K Beale, The Book of Revelation (Eerdmans, 2000).
  • S J Kistemaker, Revelation (Baker, 2009).

NT445/645 Life and Times of Jesus - Study Tour in Israel

Intensive mode

Lecturer: Jared Hood

Outcomes: To familiarise students with the geography, topography, climate and historical background of the land of Israel.

Description: To visit the key archaeological site, relating to the life and times of Jesus and be able to critically evaluate their importance for Gospel study. This will enable the student to connect key characters and places in Israel with the gospel texts.

Textbooks:

  • P Barnett, Jesus and the Rise of Early Christianity (IVP, 1999).
  • J McKay, Archaeology and the New Testament (Baker, 1991).