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EM302/502 History of Christian Missions

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: The subject gives an understanding of the expansion of the church from the apostolic age to the present day; the motives and methodologies involved in the churches’ missionary outreach are examined and evaluated; the continuing influence of previous missionary policy on the subsequent development of the churches’ missionary task is examined. There is also an opportunity for candidates to focus on the history of mission in particular areas.

Subject Outline: (each section weighted equally)

  • Section A: The spread of Christianity from the Apolostic Age to the 19th Century
  • Section B: A selected study of Church Mission
  • Section C: Developments in the 20th century

Textbook:

  • S C Neill & O Chadwick, A History of Christian Missions (Revelation; 2nd edition; New York: Penguin, 1991).

EM306/506 Issues in Missiology

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: To introduce students to the nature, perspective, history, methodologies, theories and issues of missiology as a discipline.

Subject Outline: (each section weighted equally)

  • Section A: Selected Topics in the History of Christian Mission
  • Section B: Gospel and Culture
  • Section C: Area Study

Textbooks:

  • J H Bavinck, An Introduction to the Science of Missions (P & R, 1960).
  • Lausanne Committee for World Evangelization, The Willowbank Report: Gospel and Culture (1978).
  • C Van Engen, Mission on the Way: Issues in Mission Theology (Baker, 1966).
  • R Winter & S D Hawthorn (eds), Perspectives on the World Christian Mission (rev ed; Wm Carey, 1992).

EM324/524 Principles of Evangelism

3 hours per week/directed study semester 1,

20 hours field work, annually

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Outcomes:

At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Outline a biblical basis and definition of evangelism that takes into account related key theological issues;
  2. Relate the task of evangelism to various generational and social groupings, and identify appropriate forms of  presentation;
  3. Evaluate various programs of evangelism through personal involvement and identify their own areas of competency and any areas needing development.

Description:

Section A: Biblical and Theological Perspectives

  1. An examination of evangelistic proclamation in Acts and the other New Testament texts, with attention to what constitutes the gospel message and varied approaches according to audience;
  2. Divine sovereignty and human response, faith, conversion and baptism.
  3. Motivations for evangelism; the relation of proclamation to meeting human need;
  4. Proclamation, witness and presence; the place of evangelism in Christian education and worship.
  5. Hindrances to evangelism, including brief consideration of common objections to the gospel.


Section B: Principles of Evangelism

  1. The role of the evangelist: the vocation to be an evangelist; lifestyle and message; the role(s) of the congregation in the evangelist's ministry.
  2. Communicating faith: person to person; through relationships; small groups; life networks; earning the right to speak; mass evangelism.
  3. Evangelism of carious groups : for example youth, nominal church members ethnic groups, secular humanists, factory workers.
  4. Appropriate evangelistic methods for different situations and contexts (including dialogue meetins, evangelistic church services, distinctive approaches for women and men); examination of two methods of personal evangelism.

Section C: Field Work

  1. Personal involvement (with supervision) in not less than 20 hours in specifically evangelistic programs, including at least 5 hours of direct evangelism by the student. These hours exclude preparation and writing-up time. This work should include both interpersonal and small group contexts, using the methods studied in topic.
  2. This work should include people knwon to the student as evangelist, and those unknown. Large group and media settings may also be used.

Textbooks:

  • L & M Allison, Anderson, Going Public With the Gospel: Reviving Evangelistic Proclamation (Downers Grove, IL; IVP, 2004)
  • J Chapman, ​​Know and Tell the Gospel (Sydney: Matthias Media, 1998).
  • S B Cowan & W L Craig Five Views on Apologetics (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000). 
  • L Drummond, Reaching Generation Next: Effective Evangelism in Today's Culture (Grand Rapids: BAker 2002)
  • J Finney, Emerging Evangelism (London: Darton, Lonman & Tod, 2004)
  • B Hughes & J Bellamy, A Passion for Evangelism: Turning Vision into Action (Adelaide: Open Book 2004)
  • P & M Little, Know Why You Believe (5th ed,:Wheaton, IL: Victor, 2003).
  • J Long, Emerging Hope: A Strategy for Reaching Postmodern Generations (2nd ed.; Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004)
  • S McQuoid, Sharing the Good News in C21: Evangelism in a local church context (Carlisle: Paternoster, 2002)
  • M Mittelberg, Building a Contagious CHurch: Revolutionizing the Way We View and Do Evangelism (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000)
  • R M Pippert, Saltshaker Resources: An Evangelism Outside the Box: New Ways to Help People Experience the Good News ​(Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2000)

EM 403/603 Biblical Theology of Mission

Summer Intensive/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Outcomes: To enable students to understand the nature of God as a missionary God, concerned for the salvation of the whole creation; to provide students with an understanding of the constant intention of God, throughout the period of biblical revelation, to redeem humanity and restore creation; assisting students to discern the divine intention and enablement for human co-operation in the universal purposes of God; and providing opportunity for students to integrate their study of the Scriptures, theology and personal understanding of vocation in mission.

Subject Outline:

Section A: Old Testament Perspectives:

  1. God, Creation and the world; human sin and the effect of the fall.
  2. The missiological significance of Babel and the Flood.
  3. The Abrahamic covenant; God and Israel: election, covenant and responsibility.
  4. Yahweh versus Baal; Israel and the nations; universal hope in the Psalms.
  5. The missionary emphasis of the prophets.
  6. The kingdom of God in the Old Testament.

Section B: New Testament Perspectives:

  1. Mission in the synoptic Gospels and the ministry of Jesus.
  2. Mission in the Gospel of John.
  3. The Holy Spirit in the mission of the church; missionary principles in Acts
  4. The Pauline theology of mission:
    • Jew and Gentile in Christ
    • The mission of the church and the powers; conflict, suffering and mission
    • Mission and future hope; the consummation of all things in Christ.

Note: Sections A and B are weighted approximately equally.

Textbook:

  • J Piper Let the Nations Be Glad! The Supremacy of God in Missions (2nded.: Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003).

EM408/608 Cross-Cultural Communication

3 hours per week/ directed study semester 2

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Outcomes: At the end of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Understand the dynamics of the communication process and communication theory;
  2. Outline the divine  usage of communication patterns, and understand the Bible from a communicational perspective;
  3. Analyse the principles and patterns involved in cross-cultural missionary witness.
  4. Identify their own past and present communicational activity with a view to improving their communication skills;
  5. Predict the process and meaning of the contextualisation of the gospel in particular cultural situations.

Subject Outline:

  1. Theories and models of cross-cultural communication: Culture (Nida) Incarnational (Kraft); Bonding (Brewster & Brewster; Christ and Culture (Niebuhr).
  2. Elentics (J H Bavinck); biblical foundation of communication.
  3. World views and their significance for cross-cultural communication, with reference to: naturalist; animist; folk religion; Hindu-Buddhist; Chinese; monotheist; syncretistic and multi-religious worldviews.
  4. Cognitive processes: conceptual, intiotional, concrete relational; language and communication; cultural distance and audience response. 
  5. Behavioural patterns: cultural norms and values; body language, space, time, para-language, artefacts and the environment.
  6. The influence of social structures on communication; indigenous modes of communication: music; drama; sports; puppetry etc.
  7. Media influences; media and message; audience response.
  8. Contextualisation: 
  • Its necessity; biblical mandate and examples;
  • The process of contextualisation: criteria, stage and limitations;
  • Cultural examples of contextualisation critically evaluated.

Textbooks: Prescribed:

  • D Burnett, Clash of Worlds (London: Monarch, 2002).
  • D A Carson, (ed.), Biblical Interpretation and the Church: the problem of contextualization (Eugene, OR: Wpf & Stock, 2002)
  • D Elmer, Cross-Cultural Connections: Stepping out and Fitting in Around the World (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2002)
  • D E Flemming, Contextualisation in the New Testament: Patterns for Theology and Mission (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2005
  • D S Gilliland (ed.), The Word Among Us: Contextualizing Theology for Mission Today (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2002)
  • G H & G J Hofstede, Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind (2nd ed.; New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005).
  • C H Kraft, Culture, Communication, and Christianity: A Selection of Writings (Pasadena, CA: William Carey, 2001).
  • J E & S G Lingenfelter, Teaching Cross-Culturally: An Incarnation Model for Learning and Teaching (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003)
  • Lingenfelter, S G and M K Mayers, Ministering Cross-culturally: An Incarnational Model for Personal Relationships (2nd ed.: Grand Rapids: Baker, 2003)
  • J W Sire, Naming the Elephan: Worldview As a Concept (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2004)
  • Van Engen, et al (eds), Paradigm Shifts in Christian Witness: Insights from Anthropology, Communications and Spiritual Power; Essays in Honour of Charles Kraft (Maryknoll: Orbis, 2008)

Recommended:

  • ​D J Hesselgrave, ​Communicating Christ Crossculturally ​(2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1991)
  • L Sweet, (ed.), ​The Church in Emerging Culture: Five Perspectives ​(Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003)

EM409/609 Cultural Anthropology

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Outcomes: To establish in the students’ understanding a basis for accepting and utilising the insights and knowledge of cultural anthropology as a tool in Christian mission; to develop in students a Christian perspective upon anthropology and an anthropological perspective upon Christianity; to enable students to develop a working knowledge of the patterns and processes of culture and cultural change,enabling them to understand their own cultural context and to accept the validity of different cultures; give students an understanding of culture as the context within which God interacts with people and the significance of this to churches in the world today.

Outline: (section A and B are weighted approximately equally)

  • Section A: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology;
  • Section B: Anthropology for Cross-cultural Ministry

Texts:

  • Paul Hiebert, Cultural Anthropology, 2nd ed (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1992).
  • Mari Womack, Being Human: An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 2nd ed (Upper Saddel Valley: Prentice Hall, 2001).
  • Michael A Park, Introducing Anthropology: An Integrated Approach, 2nd ed (NY: McGranHill Comp, 2003).
  • R. Grunlan & MMayers, Cultural Anthropology (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1979).

EM417/617 Spiritual Formation for Cross-Cultural Ministry

3 hours per week/ directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: This subject introduces students to practical and theoretical issues related to personal growth and ministry in a cross-cultural setting.

Subject Outline: (Each subject weighted equally)

  • Section A: Personal Spiritual Development
  • Section B: Relationship in Cross-cultural Ministry
  • Section C: Distinctive Factors in Cross-cultural Ministries

Textbooks:

  • P Casse, Training for the Cross-Cultural Mind (Society for Inter-Cultural Education, 1980).
  • M Foyle, Honourably Wounded (MARC, 1987).
  • E Peterson, The Contemplative Pastor (Word, 1989).
  • D Watson, Discipleship (Hodder & Stoughton, 1981).

EM418/618 Ministry in a Culturally Diverse Context

3 hours per week/ directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Outcomes: 

At the end of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Provide students with appropriate biblical, theological, historical, cultural and strategic perspectives on ministry in a context of cultural and strategic perspectives on ministry in a context of cultural diversity;
  2. Build the understanding and cultural sensitivity needed for ministry engagement with a community in a context of cultural diversity;
  3. Gain an understanding of the challenges in communicating the Christian gospel and establishing the church in an environment of cultural diversity;
  4. Equip students to develop appropriate ministry approaches for a context of cultural diversity, assisted by exposure to, and evaluation of existing ministry models

Content:

Section A: Principles 

  1. Culture and ethnicity, unity and division, and individuality and community in the Bible; in particular within the context of New Testament teaching on evangelism and the body of Christ.
  2. Theological perspectives: Trinitarian implications for ministry in a culturally diverse context, theology of such ministry in the context of diversity, church and culture in the New Testament. 
  3. Australia; immigration and refugees; ethnic communities; history and directions of government policy.
  4. Models of ministry in a context of cultural diversity; relevant biblical and modern examples, including multi-congregational, mono-ethnic and culturally diverse churches; homogeneous unit and other church growth principles; relational, leadership, learning style, worship preference, language, areas of tension and conflict, and other cultural variables.
  5. An introduction to the concept of cultural distance and its implications for the structure and ministry of a local church; case studies for different models being used by churches seeking to overcome cultural distance.
  6. Strategies and resources for making the transition to a local church model that reflects the demographic realities of the locality; research, design, implementation and evaluation.

Section B: Practice - Candidates are over a minimum of 20 hours to:

  1. Participate in either a culturally diverse congregation or mono-cultural congregation of a culture other than the student's own; and
  2. With the help of members of that church, observe non church attending people of that culture in their social and family context. Discern the challenges with regard to cultural variables, such as leadership patterns and processes, learning style and worship preferences. Consider possible strategies fro the future ministry of the congregation.

Textbooks: Prescribed:

  • D A Anderson, Multicultural Ministry: Finding Your Church's Unique Rhythm (Grand RApids: Zondervan, 2004)
  • R Brynjolfson & J Lewis (eds), becoming an Intentionally Intercultural Church (Waynesboro, GA: World Evangelical Alliance Missions Commission, 2004)
  • M DeYmaz, Building a Healthy Multi-ethnic Church: Mandate, Commitments, and Practices of a Diverse Congregation (Jossey-Bass, 2007)
  • L J Kramer, The Multicultural Experiment: Immigrants, Refugees and National Identity (Sydney: Macleay, 2003)
  • M Ortiz, Models for Developing a Multi-ethnic Church (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1996)
  • H Richmond, (ed.), Snapshots of Multicultural Ministry (UCA Assembly Multicultural and Cross-cultural Ministry, 2006)
  • H Richmond & Myung Duk Yang (eds), Crossing Borders: Shaping Faith, Minisry and Identity in Multicultural Australia (UCA Assembly and NSW Board of Mission, 2006).
  • Wilson, M., Churches Crossing Cultures: A Practical Guide and Workbook for Cross Cultural Ministry in Your CHurch (Anglicare, 2002)
  • G Yancey, One Body, One SpiritL Principles of Successful Multiracial Churches (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2003)

Recommended:

  • J Docker & G Fischer, Race, Colour and Identity in Australia and New Zealand (Sydney: UNSW, 2000)
  • C Foster, Embracing Diversity: Leadership in Multicultural Congregations (Bethesda, MD: Alban, 1997)
  • J Jupp, From White Australia to Woomera: The Story of Australian Immigration (Cambridge: CUP, 2003)
  • S P Robinson, C Smith & M K WIlson, ​Mission Action Planning ​(Anglicare, 2004)

EM421/621 Living Faiths

3 hour per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: To enable students to study some non-Christian living faiths in some detail; to give students an appreciation of the insights to be found in these faiths and a sensitivity to their world-views.

Subject Outline: The historical roots, beliefs, cultural influences and contemporary reforms in two of the following living faiths: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Primal religions.

Textbooks:

  • P G Hiebert, Understanding Folk Religion: A Christian Response to Popular Beliefs and Practices (Baker 1999).
  • D Burnett, World of the Spirits: A Christian Perspective on Traditional and Folk Religions (Monarch, 2000).
  • K Cragg et al, Islam from Within-Anthology of Religion (Wadsworth,1980).
  • J Jomier, How to Understand Islam (SCMP, 1989).
  • P Parshall, New Paths in Muslim Evangelism (Baker 1980).
  • A F Fernando et al, Buddhism Made Plain (Rev ed Orbis, 1985).
  • R H Robinson et al, The Buddhist Religion (Wadsworth, 1982).


EM427/627 Church Dynamics and Growth

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: To develop in students a critical understanding of the theology, principles and procedures of church growth and their significance for contemporary ministry theory and practice; to introduce students to the processes of evaluation, strategy development and effective methodologies in a congregational situation; to enable students to identify the critical issues of contemporary church growth theories from biblical principles and evangelical perspective.

Subject Outline: (Section A, B and C are weighted approximately 40%, 30% and 30% respectively).

  • Section A: Principles
  • Section B: Practice
  • Section C: Field Work

Textbooks:

  • H Conn, Theological Perspectives on Church Growth (Presbyterian & Reformed, 1977).
  • D A McGavran, Understanding Church Growth (Rev. Ed., Eerdmans,1980).
  • W Shenk, Exploring Church Growth (Eerdmans, 1983).
  • C Schwarz, Natural Church Development (Church Smart Resources, 1996).

EM440/640 Cross-Cultural Field Education

1 hour per week & 50 hours field work*/directed study

 Lecturer: Felix Chung

Description: To provide opportunity for students to experience at first hand some of the issues involved in cross-cultural ministry. To enable them to develop sensitivity to the inter-relationships between human life, the Christian gospel, Christian ministries and culture. To help them reflect upon their own culture and its impact upon their understanding of their ministry and humanity.

Subject Outline: (Sections A, B and C are weighted approximately 20%, 60% and 20% respectively)

  • Section A: Preparation
  • Section B: Fieldwork;
  • Section C: Evaluation and Reflection

* Students can choose from not less than 50 hours field work in some form of Christian work with people from a culture different than the student’s own; or a missionary trip of not less than 4 week’s residence in a culture other then the student’s own, or other form of field work approved by the lecturer.

Textbooks:

  • M Collins, Manual for Today’s Missionary (William Carey, 1986).
  • S Lingenfelter & M Mayers, Ministering Cross Culturally (Baker, 1986).
  • T Ward, Living Overseas: A Book of Preparation (Free Press, 1984).
  • P Hiebert, Anthropological Insights for Missionaries (Baker, 1985).

PVM41/PVM61 Folk Religions

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Type B Elective

Description: This unit is primarily designed for students who plan for further mission study. However, it is also designed as a general introduction to those who are interested in faith dialogue or evangelism in a cross-cultural context.

Aims: At the end of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. summarize the major theory of folk religions from a cultural anthropological perspective;
  2. identify the characteristics, issues, and problems of folk religions;
  3. analyse the characteristics, issues, and problems of folk religions;
  4. critique at least one of the folk religious phenomena in the Australian context;
  5. and respond to a specific issue of folk religions in the Australian context by developing appropriate missiological strategies.

Subject Outline:

Part A: Folk religions as systems of belief and meaning: The problems and solutions.

  • The phenomena of folk religions
  • Worldviews as systems of explanation
  • The meaning of life and death
  • Avoiding adversity and gaining success
  • Guidance and supernatural knowledge

Part B: Folk religions as systems of behavior: Symbols, rituals, myths, religious institutions and movements

  • Symbolism, rituals, myths and sense of the sacred
  • The relationship between beliefs and behavior
  • Religious leaders: Shamans, prophets, and priests
  • Cults, sects, denominations and ecclesia

Textbooks:

  • Paul G Hiebert, Understanding Folk Religion: A Christian Response to Popular Beliefs and Practices (Baker, 1999).
  • Ronald Enroth, A Guide to New Religions Movements (IVP, 2005).
  • Catherine Sanders, Wicca’s Charm: Understanding the Spiritual Hunger Behind the Rise of Modern Witchcraft and Pagan Spirituality (Colorado Springs: Waterbrook Press, 2005).

PVM42/PVM62 Ethnographic Research

3 hours per week/directed study

Lecturer: Felix Chung

Type B Elective

Description: This subject introduces student research methods in anthropology, skill and knowledge of conducting ethnographic research, collecting information, analysing information and writing an ethnography.

Outcomes: To be able to:

  1. Describe the concept and methodology of research methods in anthropology with special emphasis on ethnographic research.
  2. Know how to conduct a minor research by using participation observations.
  3. Know how to conduct a minor research by using ethnographic interviews.
  4. Master the skill of collecting and analysing information using ethnographic research methods
  5. Write up ethnography.
  6. Identify issues of applying ethnographic research in cultural learning.
  7. Critically evaluate the problem of applying ethnographic research in cultural learning.

Textbooks:

  • Michael V Angrosine, Doing Cultural Anthropology: Projects for Ethnographic Data Collection, 2nd ed., (Waveland Press, 2006).
  • Michael V Angrosine, Project in Ethnographic Research (Waveland Press, 2004).
  • James Spradley, Participant Observation (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1980).
  • James Spradley, The Ethnographic Interview (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, 1979).